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Many studies have been carried out showing that elementary and preschool children who are exposed to music or play an instrument actually do better in school than those who don’t. Participating in music and learning to play an instrument affects the development of the child’s growing brain in positive ways and has been shown to benefit a child’s IQ, reading skills, coordination, emotional expression, creativity and social skills.

Most young children like to hear a catchy tune and by taking part in singing and playing instruments, they begin to understand concepts such as high and low, fast and slow, loud and quiet, which are the basic elements of music. Singing songs for example will improve a child’s listening skills, whereas playing a simple tune on a percussion instrument can improve coordination skills.

Experts say that elementary and preschool children are exposed to a rich sensory environment when they start learning about music and playing instruments, especially when they participate in group music making. The children are socially interacting all together to achieve some purpose and taking part in the enjoyable and fun exercise of making and playing music.

There is a sense of teamwork and an appreciation of each other’s skills. Each child has their own role in the output of music when they play instruments in a group making situation. The feelings of pride, confidence and self worth are instilled in each child when they participate in instrumental music group play.

It has also been shown that there are other ways in which a child’s development can be stimulated through music and instrument playing, such as concentration, memory and imagination. In a scenario where elementary and preschool children start learning and playing instruments in a group situation, then they will definitely place themselves at an advantage than those children who do not.

All the time, whilst the child participates in instrumental music group play, helps in the further development of the brain by creating neural pathways. Scientists in Canada, who carried out research on the subject, found out that the brains of musically trained children performed better in memory tests that were correlated with general intelligence skills such as literacy, verbal memory, learning new languages, mathematics and IQ. These results were further enhanced, the scientists found, for those children who participated specifically in instrumental music group play.

The areas of the brain which control motor skills, storing of audio information, hearing and memory, actually become larger and more active when a child learns how to play a musical instrument, which in turn improves those day to day actions such as emotional perception, planning, organization skills and generally being more alert and aware.

The benefits of music and instrumental group play to a child’s development, especially when starting out in the preschool and elementary stages are proven and are clearly apparent. It equips the child in the various ways discussed, throughout their school years, on the social, academic and emotional aspects which strengthens and develops over time well into adulthood.

The activities found in One World Rhythm events have been designed to enforce cognitive and tactile skills while at the same time creating a fun and social setting for the participants.

For additional information on having an incredible school assembly out at your school, please contact One World Rhythm at (866) 794-1875 or visit the website at http://incredibleschoolassemblies.com

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This program recently aired on a local cable access channel in Pasadena, California.

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In a 2009 research study by Ohio State University’s Darby E. Southgate, MA, and Vincent Roscigno, Ph.D., two nationally representative data sources were used to analyze patterns of music involvement and possible effects on math and reading performance for both elementary and high school students. The results were astounding. The full story can be found on the Science Daily web site, but what do you think? Do you think music can impact your students as the research suggests?

The month of March is “Music in Our Schools” month. What? Never heard of it? Originally formed as a day event in 1973 by the National Association for Music Education was expanded in 1985 to include the full month of March. The purpose for the music in our schools campaign is to raise awareness of the importance of music education for all children – and to remind citizens that school is where all children should have access to music.

Many studies have been conducted on the effects of music to the brain. Scientists say that children who are exposed to music, or those who play an instrument, do better in school than those who don’t.

There are some great activities available on the National Association for Music Education web site which have little to no cost to implement.  Of course if you would like to bring something spectacular to celebrate the occasion consider one of the many music programs available on the http://incredibleschoolassemblies.com web site.

Are you going to bring music in your school this March?  We’d love to hear from you.

Pete Ellison
One World Rhythm
http://incredibleschoolassemblies.com

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Welcome to our site

Please pardon our dust as we develop our new “Incredible School Assemblies” site. We hope to have all our content populated shortly. In the meantime feel free to look around or visit our main site at One World Rhythm

Thanks,

Pete Ellison
One World Rhythm

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